Judging a Book by Its Cover

By - May 19th, 2017

Like great fashion, the books you read tell a lot about you. Here are a few that will look great as accessories with any spring outfit:

 

Amazing Fantastic Incredible: A Marvelous Memoir by  Stan Lee, Peter David and Colleen Doran
Touchstone 2015
Call Number: Graphic Novel L51

“In this gorgeously illustrated, full-color graphic memoir, Stan Lee—comic book legend and cocreator of Spider-Man, the X-Men, the Avengers, the Incredible Hulk, and a legion of other Marvel superheroes—shares his iconic legacy and the story of how modern comics came to be.

In this beautifully illustrated graphic memoir—illustrated by celebrated artist Colleen Doran—Lee tells the story of his life with the same inimitable wit, energy, and offbeat spirit that he brought to the world of comics. Moving from his impoverished childhood in Manhattan to his early days writing comics, through his military training films during World War II and the rise of the Marvel empire in the 1960s to the current resurgence in movies, Amazing Fantastic Incredible documents the life of a man and the legacy of an industry and career.

This funny, moving, and incredibly honest memoir is a must-have for collectors and fans of comic books and graphic novels of every age.” (Amazon description)

 

The Inexplicable Logic of My Life  by Benjamin Alire Saenz
Clarion Books 2017
Call Number: Fiction Sa1

“Friendships, family, grief, joy, rage, faith, doubt, poetry, and love—this complex and sensitive book has room for every aspect of growing up!”—Margarita Engle, Newbery Honor–Winning author of The Surrender Tree

“Sal used to know his place with his adoptive gay father, their loving Mexican American family, and his best friend, Samantha. But it’s senior year, and suddenly Sal is throwing punches, questioning everything, and realizing he no longer knows himself. If Sal’s not who he thought he was, who is he? This humor-infused, warmly humane look at universal questions of belonging is a triumph.” (Amazon description)

 

Lucky Boy by Shanthi Sekaran
G.P. Putnam’s Sons 2017
Call Number: Fiction Se4

Lucky Boy presents two very different American stories, tied together by the fate of a child. When Soli Castro-Valdez leaves her small Mexican village for the United States, she endures the difficult journey but arrives pregnant and undocumented. Meanwhile, Kavya Reddy, whose parents immigrated to the US from India, is living a more peaceful life with her dot.com-employed husband in Berkeley. Unable to have a child, Kavya becomes a foster parent—and when Soli winds up in immigrant detention, her son Ignacio winds up with Kavya. But the story has just begun.” (Amazon review)

Judging a Book by Its Cover

By - May 5th, 2017

In this month’s Judging a Book by Its Cover post, we highlight books from our new McNaughton Collection. The McNaughton Collection books are recently released books from the McNaughton® book leasing subscription service. If you are looking for your books to be fresh off the presses, sometimes even on the day of its release, come on over to the Baker Reading Room of Ohrstrom Library and have a look at the McNaughton Collection.

 

The Lost Book of the Grail by Charlie Lovett
Viking Feb. 2017
Call Number: McN L

“Charlie Lovett’s diverting The Lost Book of the Grail is a mystery, a history, a pleasure—and a treasure. Find yourself within its pages, and you find yourself remembering the virtues of books and book-making.”
Gregory Maguire, New York Times bestselling author of Wicked and After Alice

 

Close Enough to Touch by Colleen Oakley
Gallery Books March 2017
Call Number: McN O

“In Before I Go, Oakley address the oft-asked question: if you only had six months to live, what would you do? In her deft hands, what could easily turn maudlin becomes a funny and insightful journey with Daisy, and the love of her life, Jack. If you loved JoJo Moyes’ Me Before You, this book is for you.” (Catherine McKenzie, bestselling author of HIDDEN and FORGOTTEN)

 

Indelible by Adelia Saunders
Bloomsbury Jan. 2017
Call Number: McN S

“Magdalena has an unsettling gift. She sees the truth about people written on their skin–names, dates, details both banal and profound–and her only relief from the onslaught of information is to take off her glasses and let the world recede. Mercifully, her own skin is blank.”  (Amazon Description)

“Richly detailed and highly observant . . . Fans of David Mitchell’s Cloud Atlas and Téa Obreht’s The Tiger’s Wife will love Saunders’ debut, which takes up the mantle of myth, history, and storytelling with beautiful, sure-footed prose.”- Kirkus Reviews

 

The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See
Scribner March 2017
Call Number: McN S

“A thrilling new novel from #1 New York Times bestselling author Lisa See explores the lives of a Chinese mother and her daughter who has been adopted by an American couple. . . A powerful story about a family, separated by circumstances, culture, and distance, Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane paints an unforgettable portrait of a little known region and its people and celebrates the bond that connects mothers and daughters.” (Amazon Description)

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Judging a Book by its Cover

By - April 21st, 2017

Here is another selection of great books with great covers to be found on the New Book Shelves in the Baker Reading Room at Ohrstrom Library.

 

The Inquisitor’s Tale, or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog by Adam Gidwitz
Dutton Children’s Books 2016
Call Number: Fiction G36

A 2017 Newbery Honor Book

“What Gidwitz accomplishes here is staggering. ‘The Inquisitor’s Tale’ is equal parts swashbuckling epic, medieval morality play, religious polemic and bawdy burlesque, propelling us toward a white-knuckle climax where three children must leap into a fire to save…a Talmud. And yet, the rescue of this single book feels like higher stakes than any world-incinerating superhero battle. Part of this is because ‘The Inquisitor’s Tale’ is dense with literary and earthy delights, including Hatem Aly’s exquisite illustrations, which wrap around the text as in an illuminated manuscript.” —New York Times Book Review

 

 

 

The Girl in Green by Derek B. Miller
Houghton 2017
Call Number: Fiction M61

“1991. Near Checkpoint Zulu, one hundred miles from the Kuwaiti border, Thomas Benton meets Arwood Hobbes. Benton is a British journalist who reports from war zones in part to avoid his lackluster marriage and a daughter he loves but cannot connect with; Arwood is a midwestern American private who might be an insufferable ignoramus, or might be a genuine lunatic with a death wish–it’s hard to tell. Desert Storm is over, peace has been declared, but as they argue about whether it makes sense to cross the nearest border in search of an ice cream, they become embroiled in a horrific attack in which a young local girl in a green dress is killed as they are trying to protect her. The two men walk away into their respective lives. But something has cracked for them both. Twenty-two years later, in another place, in another war, they meet again and are offered an unlikely opportunity to redeem themselves when that same girl in green is found alive and in need of salvation. Or is she?” (Amazon description)

 

Swimming Lessons by Claire Fuller
Tin House Books 2017
Call Number: Fiction F95

“A famous elderly author looks out the window of a bookstore and thinks he sees his deceased wife. Upset by this event, he takes a near-fatal tumble and winds up in the hospital. Flora, his youngest daughter, returns home to help care for him—shortly thereafter, letters from her mother will be discovered hidden inside the books of her father’s prized library. Thus begin two plot lines, as Flora and her sister care for their father, and as their mother’s letters lay out her side of the marriage—starting with their first meeting when she was a student and he was a professor. Is their mother dead now, or did she run away? And what other secrets are hidden inside the letters? Well-paced and finely detailed, Swimming Lessons is a mystery about an uncoiling family that will keep you turning pages and cause your loyalties to ebb and flow like a tide.” Chris Schluep, The Amazon Book Review

Judging a Book by its Cover

By - February 24th, 2017

Here are some great new books that also happen to have great covers. These are all available at Ohrstrom Library on the New Books shelves in the Baker Reading Room. Come on over and check them out!

4321 : A Novel by Paul Auster
Henry Holt and Company, 2017
Call Number: Fiction Au7

“Nearly two weeks early, on March 3, 1947, in the maternity ward of Beth Israel Hospital in Newark, New Jersey, Archibald Isaac Ferguson, the one and only child of Rose and Stanley Ferguson, is born. From that single beginning, Ferguson’s life will take four simultaneous and independent fictional paths. Four identical Fergusons made of the same DNA, four boys who are the same boy, go on to lead four parallel and entirely different lives.” (Amazon description)

 

The Strays: A Novel by Emily Bitto
Twelve, 2017
Call Number: FictionB54

“A haunting evocation of life-changing friendship…THE STRAYS is a marvel of setting and characterization, re-creating a time of artistic revolution and personal revelation. Memorable and moving, this is a novel not to be missed.”― Booklist (starred review)

 

Forward: A Memoir by Abby Wambach
Dey Street Books, 2016
Call Number: Biog. W18W

“Forward is the powerful story of an athlete who has inspired girls all over the world to believe in themselves…Abby is deeply honest about her professional and life challenges – and she shows us by example how to overcome problems and live a happier, braver life.” (Sherly Sandberg, Facebook COO and New York Times bestselling author of Lean In)
“Abby Wambach has always pushed the limits of what is possible. At age seven she was put on the boys’ soccer team. At age thirty-five she would become the highest goal scorer—male or female—in the history of soccer, capturing the nation’s heart with her team’s 2015 World Cup Championship. Called an inspiration and “badass” by President Obama, Abby has become a fierce advocate for women’s rights and equal opportunity, pushing to translate the success of her team to the real world.
As she reveals in this searching memoir, Abby’s professional success often masked her inner struggle to reconcile the various parts of herself: ferocious competitor, daughter, leader, wife. With stunning candor, Abby shares her inspiring and often brutal journey from girl in Rochester, New York, to world-class athlete. Far more than a sports memoir, Forward is gripping tale of resilience and redemption—and a reminder that heroism is, above all, about embracing life’s challenges with fearlessness and heart.” (Amazon description)

 

99: Stories of the Game by Wayne Gretzky with Kirstie McLellan Day
Putnam’s Sons, 2016.
Call Number: 796.96 G86N

“ ‘The Great One’ weaves memories of his legendary career with an inside look at the sport of professional hockey, and the heroes and stories that inspired him.” (Amazon description)

 

Dear My Blank: Secret Letters Never Sent edited by Emily Trunko and illustrated by Lisa Congdon
Crown, 2016.
Call Number: 808.86 T77D

“From the popular Tumblr account of the same name comes a collection of heart-warming, tear-jerking, and gut-wrenching anonymous letters that people never intended to, or didn’t have the courage to send.
What first started as a Tumblr account with over 30,000 followers, is now a carefully curated collection of 150 anonymous letters covering a range of topics from heartbreak, unrequited love, and loss, to inspiration, self-awareness, and gratitude. Featuring exclusive content not available on Tumblr, these unsent letters are addressed to secret crushes, lost loved ones, boyfriends, siblings, parents, grandparents, and many more.” (Publisher’s website)