Spring has sprung!

By - April 20th, 2018

Spring has sprung! Check out the library’s expanding collection of gardening, sports, and cookbooks!

 

Succulents- Robin Stockwell

“Succulents are the ultimate easy-care plant: versatile, effortless to grow both indoors and outdoors, and drought tolerant. From Aloe and Agaves, to Senecio and Taciveria, this handbook by leading garden expert Robin Stockwell highlights 200 of the easiest, most useful, and gorgeous plants, and shares advice on care and cultivation. Readers will find inspiration for imaginative and exciting new ways to use succulents in striking garden designs, containers, vertical walls, and indoor arrangements, as well as step-by-step projects, such as living bouquets and terrarium ornaments.” (from the back cover)

Carrots Love Tomatoes- Louise Riotte

“Plant parsley and asparagus together and you’ll have more of each, but keep broccoli and tomato plants far apart if you want them to thrive. Utilize the natural properties of plants to nourish the soil, repel pests, and secure a greater harvest. With plenty of insightful advice and suggestions for planting schemes, Louise Riotte will inspire you to turn your garden into a naturally nurturing ecosystem.” (from the publisher’s website)

The Perfect Scoop- David Lebovitz

“This is the definitive book on frozen desserts. David has the most amazing recipes for homemade ice cream, plus lots of ideas for crunchy toppings, sweet mix-ins, and edible ‘vessels’ such as sugar cones, meringues, and cream puffs. I want to make them all!” –Ina Garten (from the back cover)

 

The Complete History of Cross-Country Running- Andrew Boyd Hutchinson

“Hutchinson… does a marvelous job documenting the lengthy history of cross-country running from the early 1800s, when the sport developed from “hare and hounds” or “paper chase” events in England to the present day, when groups are advocating that cross-country be reestablished as an Olympic event. This is a well-researched, informative tribute to cross-country running and belongs in most public-library sports collections. – Brenda Barrera, Booklist

The Away Game- Sebastian Abbott

“African teens vying to become pros in elite soccer leagues find their dreams turning to dust in this alternately hopeful and dispiriting sports saga… Abbot’s narrative features vivid profiles, engrossing play-by-play, and a sobering lesson: bad breaks and cold business calculations sometimes trump ability in the making of champions.” – Publisher’s Weekly

 

Sunny Weather in Millville

By - Systems Librarian April 18th, 2017

 

We have had some wonderfully sunny weather in Millville over the last few days, and all of our big windows are streaming in the sunshine!

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Welcome, Spring Term!

By - Research & Instruction Librarian March 29th, 2016

Ah, Spring!  More sun, more flowers and more research!

 

Yellow crocus outside of Clark House. Photograph. 15 March 2016.

 

As we enter into the most research-rich term, I am reminded of a Dan Rothstein quote, who encourages students (I would say all of us, really) to be viewing

“libraries not as repositories​ of other people’s knowledge, but as a beginning point for ​organizing their thinking around what they don’t know.​”

 

 

Quote information:

Dan Rothstein. Interview by Alison Head. Dan Rothstein: The Necessity of Asking Questions. Project Information Literacy, Smart Talk Interview, no. 24. 21 April 2015. Web. 21 March 2016.

 

 

Happy Spring!

By - Research & Instruction Librarian March 24th, 2014

daffodils photo

The library is looking forward to refreshing breezes, daffodils, and of course, spring term research!

Welcome back and happy spring term!

Photo by Jack W. Pearce

March 26, 1894

By - Systems Librarian March 26th, 2012

The fragrance of spring:

Another school record broken!  A flower in full blossom (the skunk cabbage) was found by a botany walk on March 15.  This is the earliest date on which a flower has been found during the School’s history, and is a sure sign that spring will come a fortnight earlier than usual.