Worth Repeating: “Quoted in”

By - Research & Instruction Librarian May 7th, 2013

From time to time Fourth Form students find helpful quotes located in something other than the quote’s original source.  This is referred to as an indirect source. When parenthetically citing an indirect source, do give credit to the indirect source.  To do so, use the term “qtd. in” (stands for “quoted in”) followed by the last name of the author of the indirect source, followed by the page number on which the quote was found.

For example:

Schoder concludes that in Millville, “everybody wears plaid” (qtd. in Smith 275).

The end-of-paper, complete bibliographic citation for this same item, would then begin with the author of the indirect source.

For example:

Smith, Harry. The Fashions of St. Paul’s School. Concord: St. Paul’s Press, 2011. Print.

For additional information please see the 7th edition of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, page 226, section 6.4.7.  Two copies of this text are available at the Library’s front desk.

NoodleTools for iPad

By - Research & Instruction Librarian October 4th, 2012

NoodleTools recently underwent an iPad-friendly redesign.  To access this latest version, simply open Safari on your iPad and visit NoodleTools.

Please note that opening up your RTF NoodleTools document on an iPad may cause reformatting.  Using Google Docs is recommended.

Good News:  NoodleTools is developing a native iOS app. Ohrstrom blog will let you know as soon as it becomes available.

 

How to Cite an eBook that is Only Available on an eReader

By - Research & Instruction Librarian March 29th, 2012

When citing an eBook that is only available on an eReader (meaning, an eBook that does not present its text on the web nor within a web-based database) include at the end of the citation the file name.  If the file name is not evident, use instead the name of the eReader device.

Here is an example using the Alice in Wonderland text as found on the library’s Kindle:

Carroll, Lewis. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Public Domain Books, 1997. N. pag. Kindle file.

The helpful folks over at Noodletools share their thoughts HERE.

Comparatively, here is a citation for an eBook that does live on the web, within one of the the library’s eBook collections.

Ingram, Susan, and Katrina Sark. Berliner Chic : A Locational History of Berlin Fashion. Chicago: Intellect, 2011. ebrary. Web. 10 Feb. 2012. <http://site.ebrary.com>.

 Questions about citing and/or Noodlebib?  Please feel free to contact Ms. Sanborn at (lsanborn at sps dot edu).

Image courtesy of kodomut under this Creative Common license.

Noodlebib Tutorial: Two YouTube Shorts

By - Systems Librarian February 23rd, 2011

Finishing up end-of-term papers?  Prepping for Spring Term research?

Consider using Noodlebib to craft and store citations.  The two short films below identify, first, how to create a Noodlebib account, and secondly, how to use Noodlebib to create MLA style citations.

How To Create a Noodlebib Account:

How To Create a MLA Citation Using Noodlebib:


Click HERE to access the Ohrstrom Library channel on YouTube.

Citing Indirect Sources: “Quoted in”

By - Research & Instruction Librarian January 27th, 2011

From time to time fourth form students find helpful quote(s) located in something other than the quote’s original source.  This is referred to as an indirect source. When parenthetically citing an indirect source, do give credit to the indirect source.  To do so, use the term “qtd. in” (stands for “quoted in”) followed by the last name of the author of the indirect source, followed by the page number on which the quote was found.

For example:

Schoder concludes that in Millville, “everybody wears plaid” (qtd. in Smith 275).

The end-of-paper, complete bibliographic citation for this same item, would then begin with the author of the indirect source.

For example:

Smith, Harry. The Fashions of St. Paul’s School. Concord: St. Paul’s Press, 2011. Print.

For additional information please see the 7th edition of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, page 226, section 6.4.7.  Two copies of this text are available at the Library’s front desk.

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